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MATA KULIAH & JADWAL SEMESTER 1

Kamis, 5 September 2013 | viewed (1219)

Course and Scedule Semester I

September 9 – December 5, 2013

Room 406

 

Courses

Schedule

Lecturers

Credit

Religion and Tourism

SPSAG7132

 

Monday

09.00 – 11.30

Room 406, 4th floor

Kelli Swazey, Ph.D

3

Theories of Religion and Society

SPSAG6102

 

Monday

13.00 – 15.30

Room 406, 4th floor

 

Samsul Maarif, Ph.D

3

Religion, Violance and Peace Building

SPSAG6120

 

Tuesday

13.00-15.30

Room 406, 4th floor

Moh. Iqbal Ahnaf, Ph.D

3

Academic English

 

Wednesday

10.00-11.00

And

15.00-16.00

Cory Rogers

Julie Gaynes

 

WEDNESDAY FORUM, 13.00 – 15.00, ROOM 406

Academic Study of Religion

SPSAG6103

Thursday

10.30 – 13.00

Room 406, 4th floor

Martin Sinaga, Ph.D and

Suhadi, Ph. D (Cand)

3

Academic English

Thursday

15.00-16.00

Room 406, 4th floor

Cory Rogers

Julie Gaynes

3

World Religions

(RCSC-601)

Friday

08.00 – 11.30

Room 406, 4th floor

Mark Woodward, Ph.D

Achmad Munjid, Ph.D (Cand)

4

 

COURSES’ DESCRIPTION

 

Religion and Tourism

In this course, student will review seminal theories on pilgrimage and consider this approach in comparison with ethnographic studies that situate religious sites in conversation with theories of tourism, globalization and identity. In examining economic, social, theological and political orientations that constitute the meaning ascribed to religious sites, class will approach the analysis of these places as spaces contestation that are embedded in larger national and international contexts. Class also consider how the discourse and practices surrounding these sites is deployed in the construction and contestation of normative definitions of religion, returning to the question of how to define the practice of travel to places of religious import. 

 

Theories of Religion and Society

This course is an introduction to the theories concerning relationships between religion, social life and social organization. The works of the theorists that we will consider in this seminar have played very important roles in shaping the ways in which subsequent past generations of scholars and onwards. In every case, there have been strong critiques by subsequent scholars. However, the fact that these works continue to be cited, and debated many decades, and in some instances a century of more after they were written speaks of there importance. They continue to “frame” scholarly discourse about religion and society. The class will cover mainly on Freud, Karl Marx, Weber, Durkheim and others’ classical and contemporary theories of religion and society. More specific contemporary theories will be included in Religion and Contemporary Issues.

 

Religion, Violance and Peace Building

Two things can be explored in this course: (1) the sources and dynamics of violence and peacebuilding, and how it relates to religion and religious values, (2) cultures and practices of peacebuilding that can become the alternatives to violence. This course will emphasize on how religion relates to other religions in the form of conflict and violence, as well as in the form of promoting justice and peace. From this class, student will learn the nature of conflict and violence in the society, violence in the name of religion and faith, and how religions deal with them. Other than theories and concepts, some living experience of conflict and peacebuilding will be introduced. Students are expected to study some of violence in different society and peace building movement of the society. After being involved discussion of varying ideas on peace and justice, students will study about religious perspective on peace building.

 

Academic English

The goal of this course is to improve students’ ability to write academically and to observe the norms of English in academic writing; to expose students to various kinds of academic writing and purposes; and to support students in the writing of course papers and thesis proposals; and to encourage general English fluency. In addition to this course, in the first year, prior to the beginning of the classes, all students are required to take one-month Intensive English Class. Any failure to take this preparatory class could dismiss student’s opportunity to take other classes.

 

Academic Study of Religion

The main objective of this course is to stimulate critical thinking about religion and the study of religion in the academic context. What does it mean to study religion? How do we locate religion or the religious? Following recent discussions among scholars of religious studies, we will problematize the very category of “religion”. The course will pay special attention to the role of power in shaping what we understand as religion as well as particular religions. Among the main issues discussed are the political and academic constructions of religion, of which concrete examples will be taken from recent history of religions in Indonesia as well as cases from other countries. To stimulate critical self-reflection, the course will also look at the issue of (scholars’) identities in the study of religion.

 

World Religions

In this class, students will be introduced to the major ‘world’ religious traditions practiced in Indonesia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese Religions, Christianity (Roman Catholic and Protestant) and Islam, along with Judaism. Our goals will be 1) to gain a basic understanding of the beliefs and practices of each religion, 2) to become conversant in the contemporary issues facing each religion, and 3) to gain grounding for continued comparative study and inter-religious dialogue. For this purpose, a practitioner of each of these religions will be invited to give a lecture.

 

 


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